College Student Survival via Halloween Candy, A Report

College+Student+Survival+via+Halloween+Candy%2C+A+Report

Sam Kuzmishin and Otto Gianakas, Contributors

Candy type Fun-size calories King-sized calories
Hershey’s bar 214 (428) 370
100 grand 201 (402) 350
Reeses cup 87 (174) 200 calories
Sour Patch Kids 110 (220) 140
Swedish Fish 160 (320) ———————
Almond Joy 91 (182) 220
Peanut M&M’s 90 (180) 210
Kit Kat 218 (436) 420
Milky Way 77 (154) 469
Twix 80 (160) 220
Snickers 215 (430) 440
Skittles 62 (124) 160
3 Musketeers 61 (122) 262
Crunch Bar 71 (142) 220

 

Milky way for king-sized, kit kats for fun-sized

 

IDEAL CONDITIONS

10% give away king-sized, 90 give away fun-sized

An average of 243.1 calories per house, 4 hours (5:30 to 9:30) 

5 feet between houses walls, 5-foot walkway, 30 feet wide

45 feet of running per house

 

How fast would your pace have to be to get enough candy for an entire year?

216000/510

828 houses per hour 

(510 seconds)/(45 feet per house) 

11.33 houses per minute

 

Hpm is houses per mile

Cph is calories per house 

(117.33 hpm)(243.1 cph) =  28,522.92 calories per mile

The 4 below denotes the 4 hours trick or treating

 

117.33 houses per mile  6.4 miles per hour

 

Calories gained = (hours trick or treating)(mph)(cpm)

730,000 = (4 hours)(x mph) (28,522.92 cpm)

6.4=mph

A 9:23 minute mile

 

3028 houses a night

 

2725 fun sized kit kats 

 

303 King sized Milky way bars

 

Everyone knows the feeling of coming home after trick-or-treating with a pillowcase full of candy, filled so high and weighing so much that you know before looking in that you will never be able to finish it that night. Taking it out and sorting all of it, trading with people, getting more of what you want in exchange for the ones that you just don’t need. But as the days drag on your supply dwindles down, until your once glorious mountain is nothing more than a sea of wrappers. But how much candy would you have to collect to survive an entire year? Could the average person live a full year off of only the candy that they collected on Halloween? 

 

To answer this question, we had to account for many variables. The first step in our process was, of course, finding out the minimum amount of calories that the human body can live off of for an entire year. Upon consulting the ever-knowing Google, we discovered that a 2000 calories per day was a sufficient amount for the average person to live on (please note we are only considering caloric intake and not other nutritional factors). We can multiply this by 365 to find the number of calories that need to be collected to feed someone the whole year, which turns out to be about 730,000 calories. It should be noted that we are looking at this in ideal conditions, those that are the most conducive to the collection of the highest calorie candies, which is the next variable that we considered. We looked at the top 14 Halloween candies, and how many calories the fun size and king-size candy bars had. 

 

As seen, the highest calorie bar for the fun-size sector was kit kat, and for the king-size, the highest calorie is the milky way. (note that Swedish fish king size is crossed out due to no collectible data for calories)

 

Our ideal conditions are 45 feet of running between each house, people sitting on their porches dropping candy in your bag, and 1 out of 10 houses giving out king-sized bars. Using the values we discovered above for the most calorie-dense candies, we can find that the average house gives out 243.1 calories. (If you only take one bar per house) Additionally, we are using 4 hours of trick or treating (5:30-9:30) as our time constraints. Keep in mind that these are not the official hours, but half an hour given on each end to account for the fact that some people start early and end late.

Equation one below allows us to relate each variable to each other and will allow us to solve for pace when we input the aforementioned values (equation two).

 

t=time in hours

c=calories collected

mph=miles per hour

cpm is calories per mile

 

  1. c = (t)(mph)(cpm)

 

  1. 730,000 = (4)(mph) (28,522.92)

6.4=mph

 

This means that by running 6.4 mph (a 9:23 minute mile) for 4 hours straight you can gather all of your year’s calories. Over this time you will run 25.6 miles, and collect 3,027 candy bars (302 Milky Ways and 2,075 Kit Kat bars). To meet this quota you would have to loot 12.52 houses per minute. While this may be pushing reality a little bit, with sugar and some Halloween magic anything is possible.